Find The Jobs You Are Looking For In Beijing.

Money.

One of the most common reasons young professionals move to China.

We come to earn a decent salary and then leave with the savings.

The most lucrative jobs available to us here tend to be in the education sector, mainly teaching English as a Second Language. If you love teaching, these jobs are a blessing. If you don’t, your day to day struggle is all too real.

With that being said, you do not have to settle for a teaching job if it has nothing to do with your future aspirations. If you know where to look, Beijing actually offers a lot of opportunities for young professionals to break into new fields.

While these jobs sometimes may not pay as much as teaching, be mindful of being penny wise but dollar stupid; the experience gained from that lower wage job may be more valuable in your future than the current money gained teaching.

Salary is also not the only thing to consider when looking for a new job. Does the position you’re interested in offer professional development? Benefits? Good growth potential? These factors may make up for a lower salary.

If you are looking for non-teaching positions in Beijing/China check out these resources:

Jing Jobs

www.jingjobs.com

I love this website and often recommend it. Why? The website is user friendly; the posted jobs are interesting/stay up-to-date; and since many of the positions are with startups, I find it’s allows talented candidates with some experience access to positions that would otherwise only be accessible to more senior candidates back home.

Here are some positions currently posted:

Senior Digital Marketing Manager at MiCai
General Manager at Hatchery
Business Development Manager – Strategic Partner
Program Coordinator at CRCC Asia

China Development Brief

www.chinadevelopmentbrief.cn

The China Development Brief is a Chinese non-profit organization that serves as a bilingual hub for NGOs, foundations, development practitioners, businesses, researchers, and policy makers. Their job bank offers some unique positions with both big name NGOs and others.

Here are some positions currently highlighted:

UNDP – Programme Coordinator
China Environmental Law & Governance Program – Program Assistant
Institute for Sustainable Communities (ISC) – Finance and Administration Manager

LinkedIn

www.linkedin.com

If you are on the hunt for a job definitely do not underestimate the power of LinkedIn. There are three ways LinkedIn is valuable in a job hunt:

1. If you have a completed profile, recruiters may approach you about applying for a job. This is how I came to China.
2. Under the “jobs” tab you can define a search by location and sector. There are tons of active posts for Beijing. Alternatively, you can set your account to generative a list of active positions that match your work experience.
3. Follow a company or a person. Search a key term related to the field you are interested in. Narrow the search to people and companies in Beijing or China. Reach out to the people/companies that come up.

Pounding Pavement

Most foreign companies have websites with a “Careers” section where available positions within the company are posted. This link is often found in the page footer. Check the career section for brands with offices/branches in Beijing. No matter the industry most companies have both industry specific position and also HR, Finance, PR, Customer Service, Business Development, Social Media, Project Management and Event Planning positions.

Here are some brands that may have positions available to you:

European Union Chamber of Commerce
• Local Embassies/Consulates (Example: Canadian Embassy)
British Council
Four Seasons Hotel

These resources should be a good start in finding something that meets your needs. Word of mouth is also another way a lot of people get hired here. Let people know your skills and that you are looking.

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